Open Access and Copyright

Copyright provides its rightholder an exclusive right to copy, reproduce, distribute, adapt, perform or display works of creative expression. The rightholder receives a bundle of exclusive rights which allow to exercise control over the use of the works for a period that is set at author’s life plus 70 years. Traditionally these rights were exclusively transferred to the publisher but the rise of Open Access changed this pattern for the good. Most articles, published as Open Access, are labelled as Creative Commons Licenses. These licenses, accepted by publishers worldwide, provides a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your work in science and education. Publishing in Open Access and opting for Creative Commons implicates that the most important rights will be retained by you:
• the right to reuse an article to be included in a book
• the right to share, rewrite and adapt an article
• the right to copy your article for teaching purposes

Copyright provides its rightholder an exclusive right to copy, reproduce, distribute, adapt, perform or display works of creative expression. The rightholder receives a bundle of exclusive rights which allow to exercise control over the use of the works for a period that is set at author’s life plus 70 years. Traditionally these rights were exclusively transferred to the publisher but the rise of Open Access changed this pattern for the good. Most articles, published as Open Access, are labelled as Creative Commons Licenses. These licenses, accepted by publishers worldwide, provides a simple, standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your work in science and education. Publishing in Open Access and opting for Creative Commons implicates that the most important rights will be retained by you:
• the right to reuse an article to be included in a book
• the right to share, rewrite and adapt an article
• the right to copy your article for teaching purposes

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